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Babies born by elective caesarean are more likely to contract a serious lung infection, known as bronchiolitis, in their first year or life, according to researchers in Australia.

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02/11/2011 Social media could help track flu outbreaks
Social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook could be used to help doctors detect areas where outbreaks of flu and other diseases are most likely, according to researchers from the UK.

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01/11/2011 Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis survival predicted by a blood protein
A new study has identified a protein found in the blood which could help determine how long a person with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has left to live.

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31/10/2011 Air pollution tied to lung cancer in non-smokers
People who have never smoked but who live in areas with high air pollution levels are more likely to develop lung cancer than people who live in areas of cleaner air.

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28/10/2011 Study identifies risk factors for altitude sickness
A new study has identified a number of risk factors for altitude sickness.

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28/10/2011 Scientists urge public not to doubt flu vaccine
A group of European scientists are urging members of the public not to doubt the benefits of the influenza vaccine.

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27/10/2011 Annual chest x-ray does not reduce rate of lung cancer deaths
New research suggests that annual screening using a chest x-ray does not cut the number of deaths from lung cancer.

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26/10/2011 Exercise benefits people with asthma
Physical training programmes involving aerobic exercise can benefit patients with asthma according to new research.

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25/10/2011 Heavy alcohol consumption linked to lung cancer
Recent studies show that heavy alcohol consumption could be linked to a greater risk of developing lung cancer.

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24/10/2011 Lung cancer vaccine shows promise
A vaccine, which causes the immune system to attack the most common type of lung cancer, could help slow the progression of the disease, according to new research.

 

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